Academia, Educational Technology, Higher Education, Instructional Design, Research, Social Media, Teaching

Making #SocialMedia Work to Your Educational Advantage | Enilda Romero-Hall | #TEDxUTampa [video]

Almost exactly two-months ago I gave this talk at the TEDxUTampa event hosted and organized by undergraduate University of Tampa students. The video is now uploaded to the TEDx Talks YouTube channel. I am excited to share this in my blog and I welcome constructive feedback (keyword: “constructive”). Also, please feel free to share it with others if you believe in my message:

“Instead of solely focusing on the ‘bad’ or ‘thinking of social media as a waste of time’  it is imperative that we find innovative ways to use and repurpose this online social environments in a manner that is safe, ethical, and beneficial to us.”

If you have 13 minutes to spare, here is the video:

 

Academia, Education, Higher Education, Job, Teaching

Let’s talk about complicated pregnancies #academicmamas

Had my yearly Pap Smear today and it served as a reminder of post that has been in draft folder for too long [it is also Spring Break so I get to catch up on a few things that I normally tend to put of for later]. Let’s talk about complicated pregnancies.

We often think that pregnancy is this magical time in a women’s life in which they can eat whatever they want, glow, and crochet something for their bundle of joy. Well, at least, that is what I thought pregnancy was until I experienced it.

The reality is that for me pregnancy was the worry of knowing how my baby was developing, heartburn, and sleepless nights. But I was fine with that because “it is all just part of the process.” It was until I was 22 weeks pregnant that things got “complicated.”

During a routine visit to the doctor (the first week of classes of that term) the ultrasound technician noticed that I was experiencing an “incompetent cervix.” Everything went from calm to faces of worry and the doctor rushing into the ultrasound room. I was asked to go the emergency room in the hospital and told that they were extremely worry that I would deliver early.

I was so confused by everything that was happening but without thinking about it, my husband and I drove to the hospital and expressed what the gynecologist had just explained. I was immediately checked into the emergency room at the hospital. The doctor in the emergency room explained what an “incompetent cervix” meant. Basically means that I have a “weak” cervix tissue.” What followed was just a mess:

  1. Taught class for one week that semester [Fall 2015]
  2. Then rushed back to the emergency room (and FMLA for the remainder of the term)
  3. Was told by the doctor to consider having an abortion (early delivery would mean having a baby that would not survive or would have severe brain damage)
  4.  Was told by another doctor to consider having a cerclage procedure done to prologue the pregnancy as long as possible (although he clarified the success rate for a 50/50 chance)
  5. Decided to do the cerclage and wait to see what happened.
  6. Orders of bed rest until delivery date
  7. Three long months of at home bed rest

Why did I continued my complicated pregnancy? Because I honestly could not terminate my pregnancy after watching my healthy baby boy in an ultrasound.

What is was like to do three months of bed rest? For me, it was torture. I honestly channel my energy into doing things that I enjoyed (writing, reading, researching, or anything I could do from bed/couch).

This is is really a summarized version of everything that happened. All the emotions that I experienced during those months, would be really difficult to capture in a post. I was very private about all of this, when it happened, because if things did not work out in a positive way, I did not want to mourn my loss publicly. It would have been too difficult. However, I did have many reach out to me privately and I would share what I was going through (I guess my lack of FB and Twitter post was noticed). I had many friends and family check in with me regularly (almost daily). Thank You. I also a had a dear friend that lives in the area have lunch with weekly through the three months of bed rest (thank you JoAnne Scott).

I am not writing this post because I want a pity party. I am writing and sharing it with you because pregnancies don’t always go as planned, which is even more reason to have have adequate institutional policies for pregnant women and partners. I would have never predicted my health issue (not even in my wildest dreams). Since this happened to me I’ve known at least two other women who had similar experiences, including another faculty member at my institution.

I also want to add that my story had a complicated but happy ending but not all stories end the same way. I want to share with the emotional story written by Ilde Torres Walter in her blog (it is a journey of love): http://www.journeytoliam.com/2017/01/09/hello-world/  [you should make time to read her five blog posts].

Academia, Education, Educational Technology, Higher Education, Instructional Design, Research, scholarship, Teaching, Writing

Latest Publication: #SocialMedia Use by #InstructionalDesign Departments

Our publication titled “Social Media Use by Instructional Design Departments” was recently published under ‘early release’ by the Australasian Journal of Educational Technology #openaccess

Romero-Hall, E., Kimmons, R., & Veletsianos, G. (2018). Social media use by instructional design departments. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 34(5), 86-98. https://doi.org/10.14742/ajet.3817

Academia, Higher Education, Professional Development, Research

TEDxUTampa Talk [Full-Text] #InformalLearning #SocialMedia

I am sharing the full-text of my recent talk at the #TEDxUTampa event on February 3rd, 2018 at The University of Tampa campus:

Making Social Media Work for your Educational Advantage

Enilda Romero-Hall, Ph.D.

In the year 2005, I was an undergraduate student living in a small college town in Kansas. My classmates and friends had recently started using this website called Facebook. It was: “ a better version of MySpace,” which I had never used. Of course I started using Facebook, friending others, and posting picture of my social life. It took three years but eventually, I became overwhelmed with Facebook. So, I proceeded to delete my Facebook account.

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Dr. Enilda Romero-Hall, TEDxUTampa

A year later, I had moved to a different state and city, started a doctoral degree, and was volunteering as a graduate student at an international conference. I noticed in my interactions with other graduate students that I felt out of the loop. For example: many of my colleagues had participated in a MOOC (massive open online course) about statistical analysis taught by a well known scholar in our field that they found out about through a Facebook group posting. I had never heard of it. At the end of that conference, I really started to wonder if I needed to reconsider my decision and re-join facebook.

It took me about six more months but eventually, I started to use social media AGAIN and made a conscious decision to use it for both personal and professional reasons. Not only did I join Facebook, I also joined other social media platforms with online communities that allow me to exchange information with others, connect with people who have similar interest, and informally learn about the topics that interest me.

Now, let’s fastword to 2018:

Today social media is ingrained in the way our society communicates, for good or bad. There is evidence that the use of social media will continue to grow as applications expand and new ones enter the market in the near future. Users are eager to try applications that offer engaging and unique ways to communicate with others.

I bet many of you are Snapchat, Instagram, and Facebook users?

Well, if you are a Snapchat user, you are one of 166 million daily active users. According to the Pew Research Center, social media adoption in the United States has grown from 5% in 2005 to 69% percent in 2016. This adoption rates are a global trend.

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The great majority of social media users access this platforms for informal, social interactions with friends, family, and acquaintances.

However, is not uncommon to see “concerning” headlines and research about social media in the news. For example:

  • Meghan Markle just quit social media. Here’s why you might want to as well!
  • Facebook admits that social media can be bad for you!
  • Social media is changing how we think, and not necessarily for better
  • Stop over-posting your vacation photos

Slide12

Because we have all seen pictures of our friends and family in their amazing vacations! Everything just looks so picture perfect. The kind of vacation that you dream of. Just recently I also had a picture perfect vacation. My husband, my two-year old, and I embarked on an adventure to our sunny destination: Cartagena, Colombia. The pictures did not disappoint. But let’s be honest my husband and I were traveling with a two-year old. His behavior was not always picture perfect.

Yes, he had temper tantrums.
Yes, he cried.
Yes,  he was loud when asked to be quiet.
He is a two-year old after all!

So to some extend it is true. Social media can be harmful (and affect our mental well being), difficult to manage and overwhelming, too public, distracting, and influence and miss inform us. So I am not here to tell you that it is all rainbows and unicorns, Nor it is doom and gloom. But what I want to share with you is that we have to find ways to positively use this mediums that are not going anywhere, anytime soon. There are a large number of research efforts that hope to better understand and analyze the use of social media for teaching and learning purposes. As an educator and researcher myself, I have experienced and investigated how social media can be used for informal learning purposes.

Since 2013 the graduate students in the program in which I teach have been actively using social media online communities to informally learn more about our field, instructional design. We have both public and private online social communities. In this social media communities students exchange articles, post jobs and internship opportunities, ask questions and seek recommendations, and simply stay connected. Through my research, I found out that this online social media communities have helped keep the conversation going outside of the classroom and as one graduate students mentioned: “Some posts have triggered the students curiosity and in turn has led to exploring different topics and developing skills.”

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But this informal learning experiences are not unique to the graduates students in the instructional design and technology program at the University of Tampa. As a knowledge seeker, I wanted to know if graduate students in other institutions of higher education are also using social media online communities to post, share, network, and connect. Here is what I found:

  • Students in other institutions perceive social media online communities as a quick method to help support social and knowledge communication
  • This communities help “break the ice” because it provides a relax way to communicate with others since conversations happen in a far more spontaneous and candid way
  • For students in fully online programs social media groups provided a sense of community… a sense of belonging…
  • To me what was really striking was that not only did students in this social media online communities appreciate sharing with others who have similar interest but most importantly they participated and valued the interactions with others who shared a different perspective because it challenged their views and allowed them to reflect, rethink, and in some instances re-shape their of own knowledge.
  • Of course, not all students are quick to post and share their thoughts with the world or their online communities. What I found is that some students enjoy lurking around and quietly participating while reading and consuming information provided by others.

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So you may be wondering, why is this important? Why is it important for me to invest my time to listen to this lady talk about informal learning in social media communities?

Because, instead of solely focusing on the “bad” or “thinking of social media as a waste of time”  it is imperative that we find innovative ways to use and repurpose this online social environments in a manner that is safe, ethical, and beneficial to us.

And how can you do that?

  • Become a self-directed learner. Use social media to gather information about trends related to your field or area of interest:
    • What are new and emergent topics in your field?
    • Who are leaders in your field that you should follow?
    • Where can you find rigours research related to your field of study?
  • Use social media to connect with individuals outside your network
    • It is good to connect with others who have the same ideas as you
    • But it is also good to breakout of your network because this interaction can lead to innovation
  • What it boils down to: using social media to engage in transformational learning opportunities in which you:
    • Engage in critical reflection
    • Engage in discourse
    • Take action to transform your frame of reference

Don’t get me wrong! I am not saying “stop posting your favorite funny cat videos and memes” or “stop sharing selfies of yourself.” I am also not saying that we need to overlook the challenges that social media present for our social, mental, and physical well-being. We absolutely need to find ways to deal with this challenges.

What I am saying is that there are other ways in which we can enrich social media environments. There are educational aspects that we should consider. We, as users, have the power to control: what we post, when we post, who we interact with, and how we interact with others.  You cannot rely on social media developers to provide healthy ways to use this platforms. It is our responsibility to make it work for us!

Academia, Grant, Higher Education, Instructional Design, Professional Development, Research, scholarship

Graduate & Undergraduate Mentee Contract

Hello! Happy New Year (sorry it is that awkward time of the year in which I am not sure if I should or should not say “Happy New Year”)!

I recently started a small research group with graduate and undergraduate students at my institution. Early in the Fall semester, a few students reached out to me (looking for research experience, mentorship, and collaboration) and I thought it would be a good idea. All of this students want to further their education and go on to doctoral programs. We are currently working on three to four projects together. Last semester was sort of my first time giving this “research group” thing a trial. I learned so much from the experience!

  • Consistent meetings are good
  • Have a meeting agenda
  • Set realistic deadlines
  • Understand each other’s skills
  • Understand each other’s expectations

Yesterday was our first meeting after the Winter Break. We talked about the upcoming data collections, IRB applications, conference proposals, conference presentations, and manuscripts we are planning to work on this semester (we are busy!). I also took time during our meeting to talk about this mentoring experience and what we should all expect. I shared the “Graduate Mentee Contract” to guide the discussion. It was passed on to me by an academic mama who works at a different institution. So I am paying it forward and sharing it in my blog just in case anyone else is looking for something similar.

 

Academia, Distance Education, Education, Educational Technology, Higher Education, Instructional Design, Research, scholarship, Teaching

Latest publication: “Examining Distance Learners in #Hybrid #Synchronous #Instruction: Successes and Challenges” #OpenAccess

Our latest publication titled “Examining Distance Learners in Hybrid Synchronous Instruction: Successes and Challenges” in now available #openaccess as part of the latest issues of Online Learning Journal (Special Issues of the AERA SIG Online Teaching and Learning):

Romero-Hall, E. & Vicentini, C. (2017). Examining distance learners in hybrid synchronous instruction: Successes and challenges. Online Learning, 21(4). doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.24059/olj.v21i4.1258.

Academia, AECT, Conference, Educational Technology, Higher Education, Instructional Design, Professional Development, Research

#AECTRTD is seeking nominations

Association of Educational Communications and Technology (AECT)
ELECTIONS 2018


We are looking for candidates to serve in the AECT Research & Theory Division Board (2018 – 2019), in the positions listed below:

President-Elect [Three-Year Term]
Shall be responsible for chairing the division convention planning activities (first year). Shall conduct all business, meetings, and other tasks relating to division activity within AECT (second year). Shall be responsible for elections of officers and R&T division awards (third year).

Professional Development Coordinator Elect [Three-Year Term]
Commits to serving a 3-year term through the cycle of Coordinator-Elect, Coordinator and Past Coordinator. The Professional Development Coordinator Elect assists the Coordinator with professional development event planning and Early Career Symposium funding application.

Featured Research Coordinator [One-Year Term]
Responsible for reviewing, selecting and arranging featured research sessions for the AECT convention.

Secretary [One-Year Term]
Shall document meetings, prepare minutes and complete other tasks as assigned by the division president. The Secretary is elected from the division membership annually to a one-year term.

Member-at-Large [One-Year Term]
The Member-at-large may serve any number of consecutive terms, but must run for the office each year. Serves as the voice of RTD membership. Provides assistance, as needed, with professional development.

RTD Graduate Student Representative [One-Year Term]
Must be a current graduate student.  The Graduate Student Representative acts as the liaison to the Graduate Student Assembly and provides a voice for graduate students to R&T leadership.

Communications Officer [One-Year Term]
Shall act as R&T Webmaster and run the division’s social media channels. The Communications Officer is elected from the division membership annually to a one-year term.

Self-nominations are welcomed. If interested, please send:
– Nominee’s full name and title
– Institutional affiliation
– Email address
– Short bio (300 words)
– Photo of nominee

The RTD Immediate Past President, Enilda Romero-Hall, will coordinate the nomination process. To submit a nomination, of yourself or a colleague, email the requested information to eromerohall@ut.edu by December 1, 2017.