Academia, Distance Education, Education, Educational Technology, Higher Education, Instructional Design, Lucerne, Multimedia, Professional Development, Research, scholarship, Scholarships, Switzerland, Teaching, Travel

Almost Two Weeks Later, Still Soaking It All In

Final thoughts and message from our official study abroad blogger: Marquis Holley. Love how Marquis captured complete and totally random moments, objects, scenes, and people from our study abroad experience in his photos. I think his writing and images show his background in communication and instructional design. It fills my heart with joy to know that this short experience will have a lasting effect in him as a participant in the program.

UT Spartans Abroad

It’s hard to believe, but this week will mark two weeks since we’ve all returned from Switzerland.  What a journey it was.  Here are a few more images to provide a closure of sorts for our trip.  We’re truly thankful for you following us, as well as your commentary.  Please know that education was the reason we as students decided to study abroad, and we learned more than we could imagine on this trip.  Special thanks to the University of Tampa for allowing this trip to take place.  Furthermore, the Instructors that accompanied us during this trip are to be commended. Much appreciation to Mr. Frederic Palazy, CIS representative, as a true help and guide during our stay here.  And to all of the teachers, students, administrators, and people we met on this trip, much love and gratitude to you for making it one to remember for a lifetime.  Once…

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Academia, Education, Educational Technology, Higher Education, Instructional Design, Lucerne, Professional Development, Research, Switzerland, Teaching, Travel

Reflection on the #Switzerland #StudyAbroad program

The study abroad program to Switzerland was everything that I expected and many things I did not expect. Just for reference on what I am taking about, here is the link to the post with info about the study abroad program: The official flyer: #UTampa Travel Course to Switzerland [Spring 2018]

Your can read about our experiences during the program in this blog (Main Author: Marquis Holley, UT ID&T, ‘14): https://utspartansabroad.wordpress.com

Here are a few thoughts on the experience:

Challenges

  • Jetlag sucks and it is important to take it into consideration. When I do this again, I will plan to have very light activities on the first few days.
  • It is very different to travel with students that have a high interested on the theme of the program compared to students have some interest. In the group with had a 75% of students with very high interest on the theme of the program.  The other 25% were participating mostly for the experience.
  • The leadership team of this program are very active individuals that had no problem been on-the-go. It can be challenging to accommodate for others who do things like “nap” or are not very active. If you want to participate in this type of programs or recruit students to participant, make them aware that to make the most out of the experience you will be spending very little time in the hotel room posting on Snapchat.
  • Just like with any group, there are students who tend to be more vocal. Therefore, they tend to drive the direction of the group. It is important to give the other students options or opportunities to voice their opinions/choices.
  • In making connections or plans to meet with schools, university research groups, or others, it is at times difficult to know how casual or formal the visit will be. Asking for as much information as possible before hand will help give the students context.

Good Times

  • I cannot say enough about my assistant coordinator for the program: Merrie Tankersley. I already miss her! Having a good traveling partner to bounce ideas will make your study abroad program an amazing experience. Merrie was an absolutely joy to be around. I will miss our time together in Switzerland and I look forward to our experience next year in Belgium.
  • We organized most of the logistics through a study abroad service provider, CISabroad. As part of that arrangement, we had a on-site representative all the time. We met at the airport in Zurich after arriving in Switzerland, his name is Fred. Fred was honestly the best. He was very resourceful, friendly, and extremely patient.
  • The weather was just perfect. We would have made the best out of rainy days in Switzerland but I am glad that every day we were blessed with good weather.
  • Although there were some challenges with group dynamics, I was very happy to see that the five girls in our group grew so close together. They were also very inclusive of our male student. Overall, I am glad we had each of them in the group.
  • Aside from an strain ankle and a student with a cold, we had no major incidents during the trip. All students were always on time, respectful of the program rules, and participated in all required activities.
  • Switzerland is a beautiful country (and pretty much that sums it all). Our side trip to France was a treat. I strongly recommend visiting Colmar, France.
  • I am EXTREMELY thankful to every individual and organization that welcomed us during our visit in Switzerland. I plan to spend a good chunk of my pre-departure time at the Zurich airport writing thank you emails.

I am sure there are other comments I want to write about this experience, but this is all I have for now. Here are some of the pictures I captured:

 

 

Academia, Educational Technology, Higher Education, Instructional Design, Research, Social Media, Teaching

Making #SocialMedia Work to Your Educational Advantage | Enilda Romero-Hall | #TEDxUTampa [video]

Almost exactly two-months ago I gave this talk at the TEDxUTampa event hosted and organized by undergraduate University of Tampa students. The video is now uploaded to the TEDx Talks YouTube channel. I am excited to share this in my blog and I welcome constructive feedback (keyword: “constructive”). Also, please feel free to share it with others if you believe in my message:

“Instead of solely focusing on the ‘bad’ or ‘thinking of social media as a waste of time’  it is imperative that we find innovative ways to use and repurpose this online social environments in a manner that is safe, ethical, and beneficial to us.”

If you have 13 minutes to spare, here is the video:

 

Academia, Education, Educational Technology, Higher Education, Instructional Design, Research, scholarship, Teaching, Writing

Latest Publication: #SocialMedia Use by #InstructionalDesign Departments

Our publication titled “Social Media Use by Instructional Design Departments” was recently published under ‘early release’ by the Australasian Journal of Educational Technology #openaccess

Romero-Hall, E., Kimmons, R., & Veletsianos, G. (2018). Social media use by instructional design departments. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 34(5), 86-98. https://doi.org/10.14742/ajet.3817

Academia, Distance Education, Education, Educational Technology, Higher Education, Instructional Design, Research, scholarship, Teaching

Latest publication: “Examining Distance Learners in #Hybrid #Synchronous #Instruction: Successes and Challenges” #OpenAccess

Our latest publication titled “Examining Distance Learners in Hybrid Synchronous Instruction: Successes and Challenges” in now available #openaccess as part of the latest issues of Online Learning Journal (Special Issues of the AERA SIG Online Teaching and Learning):

Romero-Hall, E. & Vicentini, C. (2017). Examining distance learners in hybrid synchronous instruction: Successes and challenges. Online Learning, 21(4). doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.24059/olj.v21i4.1258.

Academia, AECT, Conference, Educational Technology, Higher Education, Instructional Design, Professional Development, Research

#AECTRTD is seeking nominations

Association of Educational Communications and Technology (AECT)
ELECTIONS 2018


We are looking for candidates to serve in the AECT Research & Theory Division Board (2018 – 2019), in the positions listed below:

President-Elect [Three-Year Term]
Shall be responsible for chairing the division convention planning activities (first year). Shall conduct all business, meetings, and other tasks relating to division activity within AECT (second year). Shall be responsible for elections of officers and R&T division awards (third year).

Professional Development Coordinator Elect [Three-Year Term]
Commits to serving a 3-year term through the cycle of Coordinator-Elect, Coordinator and Past Coordinator. The Professional Development Coordinator Elect assists the Coordinator with professional development event planning and Early Career Symposium funding application.

Featured Research Coordinator [One-Year Term]
Responsible for reviewing, selecting and arranging featured research sessions for the AECT convention.

Secretary [One-Year Term]
Shall document meetings, prepare minutes and complete other tasks as assigned by the division president. The Secretary is elected from the division membership annually to a one-year term.

Member-at-Large [One-Year Term]
The Member-at-large may serve any number of consecutive terms, but must run for the office each year. Serves as the voice of RTD membership. Provides assistance, as needed, with professional development.

RTD Graduate Student Representative [One-Year Term]
Must be a current graduate student.  The Graduate Student Representative acts as the liaison to the Graduate Student Assembly and provides a voice for graduate students to R&T leadership.

Communications Officer [One-Year Term]
Shall act as R&T Webmaster and run the division’s social media channels. The Communications Officer is elected from the division membership annually to a one-year term.

Self-nominations are welcomed. If interested, please send:
– Nominee’s full name and title
– Institutional affiliation
– Email address
– Short bio (300 words)
– Photo of nominee

The RTD Immediate Past President, Enilda Romero-Hall, will coordinate the nomination process. To submit a nomination, of yourself or a colleague, email the requested information to eromerohall@ut.edu by December 1, 2017.

 

Academia, Distance Education, Education, Educational Technology, Higher Education, Instructional Design, Research, scholarship, Teaching

Digital Togetherness

There is no doubt that social media is ingrained in the way society communicates today, for good or bad. There is evidence that the use of social media will continue to grow as applications expand and new ones enter the market in the near future. Users are eager to try applications that offer engaging and unique ways to communicate with others. For example, today thirty percent of teens rank Snapchat as their most important social network (Oremus, 2015). This platform which was first released in 2011, today has a market of 166 million daily active users (Oremus, 2015).

The great majority of social media users access this platforms for informal, social interactions with friends, family, and acquaintances. Yet, we have also seen an increase in the use of social media for teaching and learning purposes across many different fields (Rodríguez-Hoyos, Salmón, & Fernández-Díaz, 2015). There is also a large number of social media research efforts that hope to better understand and analyze:

  • The way people communicate and connect
  • What is communicated in these channels
  • Forms of activism and protest
  • Specific groups and their online interactions
  • Equality, diversity, and social issues discussions
  • The affordances of the different platforms
  • Cultural and country-specific forms of engagement
  • Privacy and security issues

Again, it is safe to say that researchers want to learn more about the platforms, the users, and different matters associated with social media use.

A few months ago, I engaged in a research project collaboration with Dr. Royce Kimmons and Dr. George Veletsianos who are Directors of the Digital Learning and Social Media Group. The aim of the project was to understand how Instructional Design (ID) graduate programs use social media accounts. We wanted to know what type of content was posted in these accounts, how many users liked/followed these accounts, how engaged were these accounts in the content sharing process, and what kind of interactions others had with these social media accounts.

To gather the social media accounts of ID graduate programs, we took a different approach. Instead of combing the Internet and social media platforms in search of accounts associated with ID graduate programs, we created an editable Google Spreadsheet and posted it in different outlets to allow our colleagues and graduate students to share their accounts with us. We asked ID faculty members and graduate students to share the public social media sites of their ID program. This focus on public social media accounts was due to the fact that we were primarily interested on Twitter accounts for our research project. However, faculty members and graduate students gladly shared both public and private social media accounts. Here is a link to the public Google Spreadsheet: http://tiny.cc/IDTSocialMediaAccounts.

Picture1

Today, there are total of forty-six different higher education institutions listed in the spreadsheet, including public and private institutions within the United States and Canada. Based on the content shared in the spreadsheet, we saw that some ID programs/departments have predominantly public social media accounts to communicate with graduate students, faculty, and other stakeholders. In a few instances, ID programs/department have both public and private social media communities. For some ID programs/departments a “hashtag” was the main form of digital togetherness (see Table 1). However, the most common type of social media account by ID graduate programs, based on the data collected via the spreadsheet, are Facebook Pages (see Table 2).

Table 1. Hashtags of Instructional Design Graduate Programs

Institution Program or Department Hashtag
Brigham Young University Instructional Psychology & Technology #iptsters

 

California State University Fullerton

 

Master of Science Instructional Design and Technology (MSIDT) #msidt

 

Indian River State College

 

School of Education #irscTeach

 

Loyola University Maryland

 

Master of Education in Educational Technology #LoyolaET

 

Royal Roads University

 

School of Education & Technology #rrumalat

 

The University of Texas at Austin Leaning Technologies Program #UTLT

 

University of North Texas

 

Learning Technologies Program #untLT

 

University of Wyoming

 

Instructional Technology Program #wyoitec

 

Wichita State University

 

Learning and Instructional Design #MEdLID

 

We have maintained the editable spreadsheet available for others to access and edit (add other social media accounts). Although we used this editable spreadsheet as a way to crowdsource IDT program/departments social media accounts, I would hope that the spreadsheet serves as a resource for graduate students and faculty across ID programs. If you know other ID program/department which have a social media account and is not listed in the spreadsheet, please add them. This spreadsheet is opened to IDT programs across the globe.

Table 2. Facebook Page of ID Graduate Departments and Programs

Institution Program /Department Facebook Page
Boise State University Educational Technology https://www.facebook.com/edtechbsu/
California State University Fullerton Instructional Design and Technology https://www.facebook.com/MSIDTFullerton/
Emporia State University Instructional Design and Technology https://www.facebook.com/idtesu
Fairfield University Educational Technology https://www.facebook.com/FairfieldGSEAP/
Georgia Southern University Department of Leadership, Technology, & Human Development https://www.facebook.com/itec.georgiasouthern
Indiana University-Bloomington Instructional Systems Technology https://www.facebook.com/groups/iugist/
James Madison University Technology and Leadership Education Department https://www.facebook.com/JMU-Educational-Technology
 
Michigan State University Educational Technology https://www.facebook.com/MAETMSU
Michigan State University Educational Psychology and Educational Technology https://www.facebook.com/msuepet
Mississippi State University Instructional Systems and Workforce Development https://www.facebook.com/iswd.grad
Northern Illinois University Educational Technology, Research and Assessment https://www.facebook.com/niuetra
Pasco-Hernando State College Academic Technology Department https://www.facebook.com/ATPHSC/
Purdue University Learning Design and Technology https://www.facebook.com/purduelearningdesignandtechnology
The University of Tampa Instructional Design and Technology https://www.facebook.com/UTIDT/
University of California, Irvine E-Learning Instructional Desig https://www.facebook.com/eLearningCertificate/
University of Georgia Learning, Design, and Technology https://www.facebook.com/itsauga/
University of Hawaii at Manoa Learning Design and Technology https://www.facebook.com/LTECHawaii
University of Minnesota Curriculum and Instruction/Learning Technologies https://www.facebook.com/LTMediaLab
University of North Texas Learning Technologies https://www.facebook.com/UNTLearningTechnologies
University of South Alabama Instructional Design Performance Improvement Program https://www.facebook.com/South-Alabama-Instructional-Design-Performance-Improvement-Program
University of South Carolina Educational Technology https://www.facebook.com/EdTechatUofSC/
University of Toronto Knowledge Media Design Institute https://web.facebook.com/KMDI-Toronto
University of West Georgia Educational Technology & Foundations https://www.facebook.com/UwgDepartmentOfEducationalTechnologyFoundations
Valdosta State University Instructional Technology https://www.facebook.com/vsuidt
West Virginia University Instructional Design and Technology https://www.facebook.com/CEHS-Dept-of-Learning-Sciences-and-Human-Development
Western Kentucky University Instructional Design https://www.facebook.com/wku.instructional.design/


References

Oremus, W. (2015). Is Snapchat really confusing, or I am just old? Technology: Innovation, The Internet, Gadgets, and More. Slate. Retrieved from: http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/technology/2015/01/snapchat_why_teens_favorite_app_makes_the_facebook_generation_feel_old.html

Rodríguez-Hoyos, C., Salmón, I. H., & Fernández-Díaz, E. (2015). Research on SNS and education: The state of the art and its challenges. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 31(1), 100-111.