Digital Togetherness

There is no doubt that social media is ingrained in the way society communicates today, for good or bad. There is evidence that the use of social media will continue to grow as applications expand and new ones enter the market in the near future. Users are eager to try applications that offer engaging and unique ways to communicate with others. For example, today thirty percent of teens rank Snapchat as their most important social network (Oremus, 2015). This platform which was first released in 2011, today has a market of 166 million daily active users (Oremus, 2015).

The great majority of social media users access this platforms for informal, social interactions with friends, family, and acquaintances. Yet, we have also seen an increase in the use of social media for teaching and learning purposes across many different fields (Rodríguez-Hoyos, Salmón, & Fernández-Díaz, 2015). There is also a large number of social media research efforts that hope to better understand and analyze:

  • The way people communicate and connect
  • What is communicated in these channels
  • Forms of activism and protest
  • Specific groups and their online interactions
  • Equality, diversity, and social issues discussions
  • The affordances of the different platforms
  • Cultural and country-specific forms of engagement
  • Privacy and security issues

Again, it is safe to say that researchers want to learn more about the platforms, the users, and different matters associated with social media use.

A few months ago, I engaged in a research project collaboration with Dr. Royce Kimmons and Dr. George Veletsianos who are Directors of the Digital Learning and Social Media Group. The aim of the project was to understand how Instructional Design (ID) graduate programs use social media accounts. We wanted to know what type of content was posted in these accounts, how many users liked/followed these accounts, how engaged were these accounts in the content sharing process, and what kind of interactions others had with these social media accounts.

To gather the social media accounts of ID graduate programs, we took a different approach. Instead of combing the Internet and social media platforms in search of accounts associated with ID graduate programs, we created an editable Google Spreadsheet and posted it in different outlets to allow our colleagues and graduate students to share their accounts with us. We asked ID faculty members and graduate students to share the public social media sites of their ID program. This focus on public social media accounts was due to the fact that we were primarily interested on Twitter accounts for our research project. However, faculty members and graduate students gladly shared both public and private social media accounts. Here is a link to the public Google Spreadsheet: http://tiny.cc/IDTSocialMediaAccounts.

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Today, there are total of forty-six different higher education institutions listed in the spreadsheet, including public and private institutions within the United States and Canada. Based on the content shared in the spreadsheet, we saw that some ID programs/departments have predominantly public social media accounts to communicate with graduate students, faculty, and other stakeholders. In a few instances, ID programs/department have both public and private social media communities. For some ID programs/departments a “hashtag” was the main form of digital togetherness (see Table 1). However, the most common type of social media account by ID graduate programs, based on the data collected via the spreadsheet, are Facebook Pages (see Table 2).

Table 1. Hashtags of Instructional Design Graduate Programs

Institution Program or Department Hashtag
Brigham Young University Instructional Psychology & Technology #iptsters

 

California State University Fullerton

 

Master of Science Instructional Design and Technology (MSIDT) #msidt

 

Indian River State College

 

School of Education #irscTeach

 

Loyola University Maryland

 

Master of Education in Educational Technology #LoyolaET

 

Royal Roads University

 

School of Education & Technology #rrumalat

 

The University of Texas at Austin Leaning Technologies Program #UTLT

 

University of North Texas

 

Learning Technologies Program #untLT

 

University of Wyoming

 

Instructional Technology Program #wyoitec

 

Wichita State University

 

Learning and Instructional Design #MEdLID

 

We have maintained the editable spreadsheet available for others to access and edit (add other social media accounts). Although we used this editable spreadsheet as a way to crowdsource IDT program/departments social media accounts, I would hope that the spreadsheet serves as a resource for graduate students and faculty across ID programs. If you know other ID program/department which have a social media account and is not listed in the spreadsheet, please add them. This spreadsheet is opened to IDT programs across the globe.

Table 2. Facebook Page of ID Graduate Departments and Programs

Institution Program /Department Facebook Page
Boise State University Educational Technology https://www.facebook.com/edtechbsu/
California State University Fullerton Instructional Design and Technology https://www.facebook.com/MSIDTFullerton/
Emporia State University Instructional Design and Technology https://www.facebook.com/idtesu
Fairfield University Educational Technology https://www.facebook.com/FairfieldGSEAP/
Georgia Southern University Department of Leadership, Technology, & Human Development https://www.facebook.com/itec.georgiasouthern
Indiana University-Bloomington Instructional Systems Technology https://www.facebook.com/groups/iugist/
James Madison University Technology and Leadership Education Department https://www.facebook.com/JMU-Educational-Technology
 
Michigan State University Educational Technology https://www.facebook.com/MAETMSU
Michigan State University Educational Psychology and Educational Technology https://www.facebook.com/msuepet
Mississippi State University Instructional Systems and Workforce Development https://www.facebook.com/iswd.grad
Northern Illinois University Educational Technology, Research and Assessment https://www.facebook.com/niuetra
Pasco-Hernando State College Academic Technology Department https://www.facebook.com/ATPHSC/
Purdue University Learning Design and Technology https://www.facebook.com/purduelearningdesignandtechnology
The University of Tampa Instructional Design and Technology https://www.facebook.com/UTIDT/
University of California, Irvine E-Learning Instructional Desig https://www.facebook.com/eLearningCertificate/
University of Georgia Learning, Design, and Technology https://www.facebook.com/itsauga/
University of Hawaii at Manoa Learning Design and Technology https://www.facebook.com/LTECHawaii
University of Minnesota Curriculum and Instruction/Learning Technologies https://www.facebook.com/LTMediaLab
University of North Texas Learning Technologies https://www.facebook.com/UNTLearningTechnologies
University of South Alabama Instructional Design Performance Improvement Program https://www.facebook.com/South-Alabama-Instructional-Design-Performance-Improvement-Program
University of South Carolina Educational Technology https://www.facebook.com/EdTechatUofSC/
University of Toronto Knowledge Media Design Institute https://web.facebook.com/KMDI-Toronto
University of West Georgia Educational Technology & Foundations https://www.facebook.com/UwgDepartmentOfEducationalTechnologyFoundations
Valdosta State University Instructional Technology https://www.facebook.com/vsuidt
West Virginia University Instructional Design and Technology https://www.facebook.com/CEHS-Dept-of-Learning-Sciences-and-Human-Development
Western Kentucky University Instructional Design https://www.facebook.com/wku.instructional.design/


References

Oremus, W. (2015). Is Snapchat really confusing, or I am just old? Technology: Innovation, The Internet, Gadgets, and More. Slate. Retrieved from: http://www.slate.com/articles/technology/technology/2015/01/snapchat_why_teens_favorite_app_makes_the_facebook_generation_feel_old.html

Rodríguez-Hoyos, C., Salmón, I. H., & Fernández-Díaz, E. (2015). Research on SNS and education: The state of the art and its challenges. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 31(1), 100-111.

 

 

 

 

Instructional Design Research Women’s Caucus #AECT17

Please consider joining us during this Research and Theory Division panel session at the AECT 2017 International Convention:

Women Caucus
Lead Discussant:
Enilda Romero-Hall
University of Tampa

Discussants:
Zeni Colorado-Reza
Emporia State University

Ginger Watson
University of Virginia

Camille Dickson-Deane
University of Melbourne

Ayesha Sadaf
University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Tugce Aldemir
Pennsylvania State University

See you in Jacksonville. Hope you can join us!

CFP: TechTrends #AECTRTD Special Issue [Proposals due: September 15]

TechTrends Special Issue
Research and Theory Division (RTD)

The Research and Theory Division of AECT is sponsoring a special issue of TechTrends related to current innovative research methodology in the instructional design and technology field. We welcome proposals in which researchers are rigorously using innovative methods of data collection and analysis as part of an investigation that helps further advance knowledge on the field.

Special Issue Co ‐ Editors

Enilda Romero-Hall, Ph.D.
University of Tampa
eromerohall@ut.edu

E-ling Hsiao, Ph.D.
Valdosta State University
ehsiao@valdosta.edu

Fei Gao, Ph.D.
Bowling Green State University
gaof@bgsu.edu

Submissions should align with the RTD mission to promote the development and advancement of theory; promotes, presents, and disseminates research and scholarship that encompasses multiple perspectives; advocates the study of social and cultural issues in the field; supports, fosters, and mentors emerging scholars. The division provides a professional community for AECT members with an interest in research and theory. The following is a non-exhaustive list of possible innovative methods of data collection and analysis:

  • Educational data mining
  • Learning analytics
  • Social network analysis
  • Advanced statistical modeling
  • Network anthropology
  • Eye tracking
  • EEG
  • fMRI
  • Other physiological measures
  • Integrative approaches to ‘mixing’ qualitative research
  • Netnography
  • Person-centered analyses
  • Interactional ethnography
  • Rhizoanalysis
  • Photovoice
  • Art-based data analyses
  • Appreciative inquiry
  • Concept mapping research
  • Visual analysis
  • And other innovative research methodologies

Expected publication date: September 2018

Submission Information

Articles should follow the writing style guidelines for Tech Trends. Submissions should be 4000-­‐5000 words in length (10 ­‐15 pages) and abstracts should not exceed 150 words. Use APA formatting throughout.

Please upload a PDF file with your name, institution, and email address as well as a brief overview (approx. 500 words) of the proposed article using the following link: http://tiny.cc/TechTrendsRTDSpecialIssue for initial review. If accepted for review, you will be directed to a Tech Trends portal for this special issue where you will submit your full article per the schedule below.

We kindly ask authors to also serve as reviewers for the submissions. Reviewers will also be requested from the overall AECT RTD membership. Thank you.

Important Dates

  • August 7, 2017 ‐ Call for Proposals posted
  • September 15, 2017 ‐ Proposals due: http://tiny.cc/RTDSpecialIssue_Dropbox
  • October 16, 2017 ‐ Notify accepted proposals
  • January 29, 2018 – Full submissions due AND start peer review process
  • March 16, 2018 – Reviews due
  • April 27, 2018 – Notify authors of review decisions
  • June 1, 2018 – Final and reviewed papers due

 

The Miscarriage

I have been dreading writing this post because just thinking about the events that transpired makes me emotional and sad. However, I feel encouraged to share my story thanks to the many comments I have received (in person or online) from other women who can relate to my previous post about been an  academic mama. I hope that this post reaches others (men and women) so that we can be more open to share and discuss the emotions, decisions, and life experiences during/after a miscarriage.

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Here is my story:

It was August 2014 and I was super excited! I had recently found out that we were expecting a baby. I am a woman in my mid-thirties so, before finding out about my pregnancy, I was a bit worried about the possibility of getting pregnant. Finding out that I was expecting, filled me with joy. I was happy. Of course, I experienced all the symptoms that a woman will endure in the first three months of pregnancy (nausea, exhaustion, vomiting). As an assistant professor that Fall 2014 semester was difficult, both emotionally and physically. However, pregnancy wise everything seemed to be going well. During my eight week check-up, I had an ultrasound and was able to hear the baby’s heartbeat.

The day before my 12 week check-up, I looked in the mirror and I remember telling my significant other that I did not feel pregnant. I was no longer feeling nauseous and I noticed my belly was not growing as much as before. He told me not to worry (perhaps it was normal as I was going into the second trimester). The next day, October 30, was probably the most difficult day in my life. I met my husband at the hospital to see the doctor and have an ultrasound. It was going to be his first time getting to see the baby. I remember laying in the hospital bed while the ultrasound technician tried for several minutes to find the heartbeat of the baby. However, after a few minutes she turned to me and said: “I am so sorry. Your baby does not have a heartbeat. Based on the size of your fetus, you probably miscarried a week or so ago.” I felt my heart drop to my stomach. I kept wanting the technician to be wrong. A few minutes later, the doctor walked in and she reassure me that I had not done anything wrong. She mentioned that a high percentage of pregnancies end in miscarriages. She asked me if I preferred to wait for my body to miscarried on his own or if I prefer a D&C (Dilation and Curettage). I decided that I would much rather have a D&C (your body can take weeks before it realizes that you need to miscarry the fetus). The doctor scheduled me for an emergency D&C the next day, which meant full anesthesia and a trip into the operating room (OR). That evening we went home and cried for hours.

I could not sleep at all (this went on for several nights). I spend hours thinking about everything I had done the previous weeks. Wondering if I had too much stress, if I worked too hard, if I ate enough… maybe it was the yoga class I did… I thought I did something wrong…

The next day, October 31, I had an emergency D&C. It was an outpatient procedure so I went home that evening and was given orders to return for a post-operative appointment in 6 weeks. The following week, still feeling sad and heartbroken, I attended the AECT conference. I really was not in the mood to socialize but I did it because… at least I could focus my attention on something else for a few days and it was in state so if I had any medical issues I could return home quickly. After returning home from the conference, I still had a month and a half until the end of the semester and I had to find strength (mentally and physically) to make it until finals week.

I wish I could tell you that my recovery after the D&C was smooth sailing. Nope. It was far from that. I found out after six weeks of “recovery” that the D&C was not performed correctly (I still had tissues of placeta from my pregnancy in my uterus)  and that in order to recover I was going to have a second D&C. Yes, this things happen. For a second time, I had to go into the OR (on December 26: a day after Christmas and just a few days before leaving the country for a professional development trip overseas). I was extremely weak physically (anemia) and upset by the fact that I was still dealing with something I wanted to put behind me. So there I was on December 26 back in the OR. A few weeks later, during my professional development trip, I was sitting in a coffee shop in Istanbul reflecting on everything and just hoping to recover. At the beginning of the Spring 2015 semester (beginning of February) I had my post operative check up for the second D&C and I was relieved to find out that it had all gone well.

The physical and emotional recovery from the miscarriage took months for me… Yet, the world continued to move forward around me. I tried my best to deal with the loss but I would lie if I told you that I “took time” to myself. I had only told a few friends what I had experienced and I could tell it was extremely awkward for them to find ways to approach the topic. I was able to openly discuss what had happened with my mom and husband. It helped me tremendously. I know that there are women who experience many miscarriages (two, three, or more). Just know that you are not alone. When I told my mom what had happened, she told me that she had also experienced a miscarriage. Something she had never shared with me before. Again, it is hard for me share something so personal but I think it is important. I no longer blame myself for my miscarriage. I have taken the time to read more about it and discussed the topic with other women who have experience it.

 

 

#AECT2017 Early Career Symposium: Now Accepting Applicants

AECT’s Research and Theory Division will be hosting the 2017 Early Career Symposium this year sponsored by AECT. The symposium will be held as a half day online conference October 28th and at the annual AECT International Convention on Tuesday, November 7 (half day 1-6 PM starting with lunch) and Wednesday, November 8 (half day, 7:30AM – noon, ending with lunch together with the AECT Board), 2017, in Jacksonville, Florida. The symposium will thus engage participants in a day and a half of focused career mentoring and networking.

The symposium will reimburse Early Career faculty and Advanced Graduate Students with the conference fee ($395 for Early Career Faculty and $240 for Advanced Graduate Students). Reimbursements are pending submission of receipts after the symposium.

http://www.aect.org/events/mentor/CareerSymposium.asp